"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."

"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."
Saint Francis DeSales

Lego Challenge #33: Monochromatic

Inspired by Sam's Lego Quest, (which is no longer active),  I wanted to start a 
weekly Lego challenge 
that kids can do and you can link up to. 
This linky has been open for a whole year, and will be closed soon. If you want to link up, please do so this week.
With the photo, please give your child's age, what country (or, if the the US, what state) you are from and anything your child wants to say about his or her creation.This can be simple or extremely complex, it's up to you. The only real rule is that it has to be custom built. Your own creation, not a pre-designed one.
You can write a separate post for the challenge or you can just add the photo of your child's entry for the challenge to a weekly wrap-up post.
You can also get inspiration with these posts, even though their linkies are now closed.  
You can write a separate post for the challenge or you can just add the photo of your child's entry for the challenge to a weekly wrap-up post.

Lego Challenge #33: Monochromatic
Pick a color, any color, and use only that color of LEGO.
Build anything, but you can only use one color!


With the photo of your child's creation, please give your child's age, what country (or, if the the US, what state) you are from and anything your child wants to say about his or her creation.




If you don't have a blog and would like to share photos of your child's completed challenges, please feel free to send me your photos (bergenholtzfamily@gmail.com) and I will post them in the next challenge's post.

Creative Kids Lego Challenge -- a new challenge everyweek
If you do your Monochromatic in blue, you can link up at Mom with a Lessonplan as well.

Lego Challenge # 32: Build A Tool

Inspired by Sam's Lego Quest, (which is no longer active),  I wanted to start a 
weekly Lego challenge 
that kids can do and you can link up to. 
This linky has been open for a whole year, and will be closed soon. If you want to link up, please do so this week.
With the photo, please give your child's age, what country (or, if the the US, what state) you are from and anything your child wants to say about his or her creation.This can be simple or extremely complex, it's up to you. The only real rule is that it has to be custom built. Your own creation, not a pre-designed one.
You can write a separate post for the challenge or you can just add the photo of your child's entry for the challenge to a weekly wrap-up post.
You can also get inspiration with these posts, even though their linkies are now closed.  


You can write a separate post for the challenge or you can just add the photo of your child's entry for the challenge to a weekly wrap-up post.

Lego Challenge #32: Build a Tool

Design a tool. This can be something that already exists in the tool world, or it can be an invented tool for a particular job that you have in mind. This can be very simple or extremely complex, it's up to you. Maybe even think about some of the first tools ever invented by man or animal to serve them.

With the photo of your child's creation, please give your child's age, what country (or, if the the US, what state) you are from and anything your child wants to say about his or her creation.




If you don't have a blog and would like to share photos of your child's completed challenges, please feel free to send me your photos (bergenholtzfamily@gmail.com) and I will post them in the next challenge's post.


World Geography and Culture: Oman

World Geography, Lesson 3: Oman
This week's geography lessons took us to Oman...
where we learned about the places...

"Salalah is a historic center of the frankincense trade, on the edge of Dhofar, a wild land of warring tribes, remote mosques and desolate coastline. One fairly new development has been the establishment of a dairy industry, and in pastures recalling rural England, imported Friesian cattle graze alongside camels nibbling frankincense trees -another of the wonderful juxtapositions of modern Oman." -World Food Cafe

the people...

"Age-old traditions of hospitality are observed, and we often found ourselves guests in people's homes, consuming dates and cardamom coffee."

and the foods of this region.
We enjoyed this meal the most of all the meals we have tried so far. It was heavenly and only a tiny bit of the rice was left, which we will make into rice pudding.

September 12-18, Our Homeschool Weekly Report, week 3

September 12-18
What did we do this week?
It has been a busy week for us. I had a doctor's appointment, James has an orthodontist appointment and...
photo by Denise Toth

we went bowling with friends.

photo by Denise Toth

The boys went up in an airplane with the Young Eagles program at Massey Airpark.
It was Sam's last time in the program.

Week 3

English (The Logic of English)

Phonograms: ck, ee, ng, th
Short and Long Vowels
Spelling Rule: ck is used only after a single vowel which says its short (first) sound
Grammar: Adjectives


Math (Learn Math Fast)

Subtracting Double Digit Numbers
Equivalent Fractions



Science (Exploring Chemistry and Physics)

We are working on some models made with floral wire and beads to show the parts of an atom, orbitals and how covalent and ionic bonding work. (Post coming soon.)

Bible: The Picture Smart Bible

We have been working through Genesis using the Picture Smart Bible curriculum. So far the boys are liking it.
History: Ancient History: The Celts
This week we looked at the Ancient Celts' houses and household items.

World Geography and Culture (World Food Cafe): Egypt and the Levant

We have studied Egypt before, so we briefly went over the similarities and differences between this area and Morocco, which we studied last week.
We also tried another Moroccan dish, Quarzazate Couscous, which went over very well with those that would eat it. Sam, Alex and Quentin, seeing all the vegetables that went into it, refused to try it, which proves that preferences do not always have to do with exposure. :)

Co-op: Leadership/Team-building and Art (Drawing)

 In team-building class, they broke into pairs. One in each pair built something with blocks and had to describe to his partner how to make the identical project, without either partner seeing what the other is doing.
 Next, different pairs had to work together to build the tallest structure they could using 1 yard of tape, one yard of yarn, 20 spaghetti noodles and 1 marshmallow. 

They were to measured by the bottom of the marshmallow to the floor, and the groups had a competition to see which group could build the tallest structure.


In drawing class we worked on shading spheres.


Join me at...

History and Geography Meme #135: Using Non-Textbooks for Geography Studies

Geography As It's Usually Taught

"How is geography usually taught? The child has to memorize the capital cities of Europe, or the rivers of England, or the names of mountains in Scotland, from some miserably dull textbook. He has to learn how many miles long, or feet high, or population count, or find the names on his map, whatever his teacher assigns. Poor child! His lesson is difficult, but is it educating him? Is it developing his mental power or broadening his mind? No, he'd learn more by watching a fly walk up a window. But someone might argue, geography serves more purpose than just educational. Shouldn't everybody know the kinds of things geography teaches? Yes, but consider a classroom of children. Shouldn't their geography lessons teach them the kind of things that grown-ups would like to know? Consider how unreasonable we adults are. We would never read a travel book that wasn't interesting, lively and adventurous. Even when we go around with our Fodor's travel guide in hand, we skip the dry facts and figures and read the interesting descriptions of places. That's the kind of thing we like to know about and that we remember easily. But we refuse such interesting tidbits for our children. We don't let them have vivid phrases to dream about. No, we think they need facts, names and figures." 

Geography Should be Interesting

"But, you might argue, although dry facts may be difficult to learn, it's useful later in life to know those things. Not true, and here's why. Those facts were never really received and assimilated by the mind. They never became more than unattached vague terms of short-term memory. Most of us have spent hours over the drudgery of memorizing geography lessons, but how much do we remember? We only remember the pleasant descriptions we heard from friends who visited Europe, or some things from The Voyages of Captain Cook, or some other adventure. And that's how children should learn geography. To be educational, the child's mind must be filled with ideas. His imagination must be enhanced with images. He must learn geography in a way that he'll remember. In other words, he should learn what's interesting to him. What's educational and what's practical both work together, and a child's geography lessons become his favorite part of school." -Charlotte Mason

The Meaning of a Map

"...give him thorough, detailed knowledge of any country in the world, and some county or district near his home. He doesn't need to memorize 'the geography' of every country in Europe, or the names of the seven continents. Those are merely meaningless names to him for the most part. Even if he does learn them, he probably won't remember them. But if he can feel at home in any one region, if he can envision in his mind the people there working and having fun, the flowers and trees bearing fruit in their season, the animals that are common there, and if he can see it all sympathetically as an adventurous traveler, then he will know more than if he had learned all the names on the map. The way to accomplish this kind of teaching is simple and obvious. Read to him, or read to yourself and tell him back a little bit at a time, an interesting, well-written travel book such as Tropical World or Polar World, both by G. Hartwig, or Unbeaten Tracks in Japan by Isabella Bishop Bird. You may have to leave out a lot, but every anecdote or description that helps show something about the place will enhance the child's education. Here, as with everything else, it isn't how many things he knows about that counts, but how much he knows about each thing."


"Geography should mostly be learned from maps. Talking about landscapes and reading travel books is only an introduction to geography. When the child begins real geography lessons, he should be learning from maps. This principle is important. No matter how many interesting facts and anecdotes a child may know about Italy, if he isn't familiar with it on a map, then he knows nothing about its geography. So his geography lessons should begin by learning what a map is and how to use one." -Charlotte Mason
Egyptian Feast


I have really enjoyed the community of homeschoolers we have built here and I encourage you to check out the links you may not have seen and make a comment on the posts.
As always I hope that you continue to link your new (and old) posts with any history and geography topic to this meme every Thursday.

What history and geography studies have you been doing?

  Remember that I am pinning all posts to Pinterest.
You might want to check out the Pinterest board and see all the past posts.
Follow Phyllis Bergenholtz's board History and Geography Meme on Pinterest.

Please include this button on either the post you have linked or your sidebar or mention All Things Beautiful History and Geography meme in your post with a link. All posts that do not link directly to a history or geography post will be deleted.
All Things Beautiful

World Geography and Culture: Egypt and the Levant


"The Bedouin are warm, hospitable, generous and entertaining hosts. The harsh desert environment has inspired traditions of providing food, drink and shelter to any passing stranger."  - World Food Cafe


This week our geography studies took us to Egypt ...

and the Levant, which today consists of the island of Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, and part of southern Turkey (the former Aleppo Vilayet). The term Levant, which appeared in English in 1497, originally meant the East in general or the Mediterranean lands east of Italy. It is borrowed from the French levant which speaks of the French involvement in the area. In French it means "rising", referring to the rising of the sun in the east, or the point where the sun rises. The populations of the Levant share not only the geographic position, but cuisine, some customs, and history.



"Bread plays an essential part in the diet of this region. Its Arabic name, aysh means 'life' and it is part of every meal, from the most basic street snack to he grandest Bedouin feast. All breads from this region are unleavened."  - World Food Cafe


We ate Ful medames, which is Egypt's national dish and several side salads for dinner, and for the meat-eaters, I suggested that we make chicken kabobs to eat in the pita bread. When James was preparing the meat, however, he decided just to cook the chicken in strips, without making them into kabobs. The Ful medames is made from fava beans, something we had never had before, but we found them to be not much different than Lima beans.

"Ful medames is served all across Egypt and Jordan by everyone from street vendors and small cafes to the smartest hotels...accompanied with fresh salads of beet, radishes, red onion, tomato, cucumber, carrot, plenty of parsley and cilantro leaves and of course pita bread." - World Food Cafe

Baba Ghanoush
Another day we had a lunch of Baba Ghanoush (an eggplant dip) and hummus, both served with warm pita bread. The Baba Ghanoush Steven and I loved, but the kids wouldn't touch. They enjoyed the hummus, however.

Lego Challenge # 31: Autumn

Inspired by Sam's Lego Quest, (which is no longer active),  I wanted to start a 
weekly Lego challenge 
that kids can do and you can link up to. 
This linky has been open for a whole year, and will be closed soon. If you want to link up, please do so this week.
With the photo, please give your child's age, what country (or, if the the US, what state) you are from and anything your child wants to say about his or her creation.This can be simple or extremely complex, it's up to you. The only real rule is that it has to be custom built. Your own creation, not a pre-designed one.
You can write a separate post for the challenge or you can just add the photo of your child's entry for the challenge to a weekly wrap-up post.
You can also get inspiration with these posts, even though their linkies are now closed.  

You can write a separate post for the challenge or you can just add the photo of your child's entry for the challenge to a weekly wrap-up post.


Lego Challenge #31: Autumn
Now that fall is upon us, can you build something out of Legos that makes you think of Autumn? Is it apple trees? Colorful fall leaves? 
Or, perhaps a fall scene? Make whatever you want to make that reminds you of autumn.

With the photo of your child's creation, please give your child's age, what country (or, if the the US, what state) you are from and anything your child wants to say about his or her creation.




If you don't have a blog and would like to share photos of your child's completed challenges, please feel free to send me your photos (bergenholtzfamily@gmail.com) and I will post them in the next challenge's post.

Young Eagles Program

2010
Did you know that your kids (ages 8-17) can experience going up in a small plane...
2010
for free?
2013
My kids have been doing this almost every year for the past several years and they love it.
2014
The pilot explains what will happen during the flight. You may talk about the airplane, review an aeronautical chart or map, and complete a careful “walk-around” preflight inspection of the airplane.
2014
The pilot explains the interior of the airplane, including the operation of the aircraft door, safety belts, and instrument panel.
2013
The flight lasts between 15 and 20 minutes. And, if you want, your pilot may let you take the controls!
2014
You also get an official Young Eagles logbook with a personal code to activate your free EAA Student Membership and Sporty’s Learn to Fly Course.
2014
Click here to find the nearest participating Young Eagles program to you.

My Fall Bucket List


  1. First Day of School Cones
  2. Celebrate the autumnal equinox!
  3. Celebrate Katie's 23rd birthday.
  4. Collect acorns and decorate lanterns with them.
  5. Go letterboxing
  6. Begin deciding what costumes we will need for Halloween.
  7. Make mini fall leaf cookies
  8. Make a fall snack mix for co-op.
  9. Celebrate Oktoberfest
  10. Play in a huge pile of newly raked leaves.
  11. Make glycerin preserved leaves
  12. Go on a retreat with my best friend.
  13. Go to a pumpkin patch.
  14. Make chocolate skeleton and mummies cookies.
  15. Go to a fall festival.
  16. Visit an apple orchard.
  17. Make a candy corn cake
  18. Make candied apples.
  19. Make a chili bar.
  20. Make pumpkin pie dip.
  21. Roast pumpkin seeds.
  22. Make pumpkin pancakes.
  23. Carve jack-o-lanterns.
  24. Drink warm apple cider on a chilly nighttime nature walk.
  25. Get and hang up bird feeders.
  26. Do a poppy art or craft for Remembrance Day
  27. Have a Halloween party.
  28. Go trick or treating.
  29. Make soul cakes
  30. Make pumpkin cinnamon rolls.
  31. Celebrate my 53rd birthday.
  32. Have an outdoor photo session.
  33. Celebrate Martinmas
  34. Put up Katie's bat house.
  35. Press leaves.
  36. Go on a hayride.
  37. Have a pre-Thanksgiving pie exchange with my homeschool group.
  38. Celebrate Thanksgiving.
  39. Make an advent calendar
  40. Make pumpkin spice soap
For more fall-inspired ideas...
Follow Phyllis Bergenholtz's board My Fall Bucket List on Pinterest.