Home School Life Journal

Home School Life Journal

Science Sunday: What We Did in July

The Components of Blood
This has been a super busy month for us all, and because of it school work has taken a backseat. We began our study of the circulatory system with a project of making a model of the components of blood.
Exploring-Non-Newtonian-Fluids-Oobleck
5 Minute Science: Non-Newtonian Fluids at Planet Smarty-Pants
The only link-up I had this month was from Planet Smarty-Pants about Oobleck.


What science studies have you been doing?

I am pinning all posts to Pinterest.

Please include All Things Beautiful Science Sunday Meme in your post with a link
All posts that do not link directly to a science related post will be deleted.

July 17-23 Our Homeschool Weekly Report, week 34: Monks

July 17-23
week 34

We had opening night of Quentin's play this week, so it was a crazy busy week.

Despite all of that, we spent time with friends and the boys did a little school work. They...
  • learned about the Canterbury Cathedral. 
  • made baked pears.
  • played with marbles and Odds and Evens.
  • learned about the crusades.
  • learned about leeches.
  • learned about Exeter Cathedral.
  • completed nun and monk math problems.
  • learned about the medieval stone mason.
  • wrote and sketched in their history journals.
  • made a medieval sun dial.
  • made and wrote with their own quill pens.
Sources and Resources: 

What has your week been like?

Join me at...
    Don't forget the Memes here at All Things Beautiful:
    History and Geography on Thursdays

    Science on Sundays

    History and Geography Meme 172: Medieval History in Literature: The Pied Piper of Hamelin by Robert Browning

    source



    First verse The Pied Piper of Hamelin by Robert Browning


    Technically speaking the poem, The Pied Piper of Hamelin by Robert Browning, is not Medieval literature as it was written in 1842, but since its subject is Medieval, we are studying it during our Medieval studies. The earliest known record of the story is from the town of Hamelin, which is a real town in Germany, and is depicted in a stained glass window created for the church of Hamelin, which dates to around 1300 The church was destroyed in 1660, but several written accounts of the story have survived. 
    Although the earliest references describe a piper, dressed in multicolored clothing, the rats were first added to the story from about 1559 and then the pied piper became a rat-catcher hired by the town to lure rats away with his magic pipe. When the citizens refuse to pay for this service, he retaliates by turning his power that he put in his instrument on their children, leading them away as he had the rats. Some theories have been proposed suggesting that the Pied Piper was a symbol of hope to the people of Hamelin which was attacked by plague. He moved all the rats out from the town of Hamelin and thus saving the people from the epidemic disease.  Others think that the story's disappearance of the children are also related to the plague, which may have taken their lives.
    Whether or not this part is true, the story gives reason behind the 130 children who disappeared from the town of Hamelin in 1228. Other theories are that the children left town to join the Children's Crusade to reclaim Jerusalem, or that because of overpopulation in Hamelin, a group of young people were sent away to colonize lands in eastern Europe.  

    What history and geography studies have you been doing this week?
    I have really enjoyed the community of homeschoolers we have built here and I encourage you to check out the links you may not have seen and make a comment on the posts.

    As always I hope that you continue to link your new (and old) posts with any history and geography topic to this meme every Thursday.

    Multicultural Kid Blogs
    Don't forget to link up to the Multicultural Kids Blog's Blog Hop each month.


      Remember that I am pinning all posts to Pinterest.
    You might want to check out the Pinterest board and see all the past posts.
    Follow Phyllis Bergenholtz's board History and Geography Meme on Pinterest.

    Please include this button on either the post you have linked or your sidebar or mention All Things Beautiful History and Geography meme in your post with a link. All posts that do not link directly to a history or geography post will be deleted.
    All Things Beautiful

    Science Sunday: The Circulatory System Activities for Elementary Students

    teachinginroom6      5th grade blog
    Flat heart model for science notebook
    From Easy Make & Learn Projects: Human Body (Grades 2-4)
    as shown on Teaching in Room 6
    how to make an edible model heart
    How to Make an Edible Heart from Adventures in Mommydom
    art craft based on functioning of heart
    Yarn Heart from Mommy Labs
    Blood Cell Model at Delivering Grace

    Heart Model from The Scientific Mom

    Sources and Resources:
    • Exploring Creation with General Science, Jay Wile
    • Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology, Jeannie Fulbright and Brooke Ryan

    What science studies have you been doing?

    I am pinning all posts to Pinterest.

    Please include All Things Beautiful Science Sunday Meme in your post with a link
    All posts that do not link directly to a science related post will be deleted.


    July 10-16 Our Homeschool Weekly Report, week 33

    Quentin at Rats! rehearsal.
    Most of our week has been filled with Quentin's drama camp. Next week is the performances. We also had friends over for a game night.
    week 33
    As far as schoolwork goes, the boys...
    • Learned about the daily life of a monk, and wrote in their history journals.
    • Made a stained glass project. (post coming)
    • Learned about Westminster Abby and religious statues,and wrote in their history journals.
    • Learned about Jean Pucelle and the Book of Hours, and wrote in their history journals..
    • Made a monk's costume.
    • Played hopscotch and London Bridge.
    • Learned about the Miracle Plays.
    • Wrote their own Miracle Plays.
    • Completed monk's math problems.
    • Learned about All-Hollow's-by-the-Tower, and wrote in their history journals.
    • Made Illuminated letters in their history journals.
    • Learned about the church as a place of learning and wrote in their history journals.
    • Learned about the murder of Thomas Beckett and wrote in their history journals..
    • Learned about the poem, The Pied Piper by Robert Browning.
    • Learned about the heart and the circulatory system and wrote in their science journals.
    Sources and Resources: 
    • Time Capsule: Medieval History
    • Exploring Creation with General Science, Jay Wile
    • Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology, Fulbright and Ryan
    What has your week been like?

    Join me at...
      Don't forget the Memes here at All Things Beautiful:
      History and Geography on Thursdays

      Science on Sundays

      History and Geography Meme 171:Medieval History: The Feudal System and the Knight

      Since we have moved on to the next level in the feudal system, I took this opportunity to look at the system in a different way. This activity comes from my friends at Angelicscaliwags



      The king who rules all... 
      In this activity, we have a imaginary kingdom, with a king who is in control of a large amount of land. He cannot rule the vast kingdom, however, without some help. He therefore, divides his kingdom in half, giving the land to two nobles in exchange for their allegiance.


      The knights who fought for all...
      The nobles, in turn, want help in protecting their land, and so they get the support of three knights each.



      The peasants who worked for all...
      The land needs to be farmed in order to supply kingdom, and so there are 12 peasants in our kingdom. 



      In our imaginary kingdom, we had a harvest of 210 M&M's, which can be equally divided into our 21 families that are in our kingdom, giving each 10 M&M's. 

      The peasants, however, have to pay 6 of their 10 chocolates to the knights in return for their protection, and so our peasants end up with 4  M&M's, or 40% of their share of the original harvest.

      Each knight had to show his allegiance to his noble by giving him a fidelity payment of 5 out of the 6  M&M's he collected from the peasants. Each knight, therefore ended up with 12  M& M's, his original 10 and 2 from the 6 peasants he protects, giving him 120% of the original share of the harvest.


      The knights pass on the 5 M&M's collected from each of the peasants, to the nobles, giving each noble 30 M&M's, in addition to their original 10 M&M's harvest share. 


      The noble, however, has to pass on to the king 6 M&M's from each knight who had paid his allegiance, or 18 from the 3 knights each noble has. The nobles, therefore, end up with 22 M&M's, or 220% of their original share of the harvest.


      The king, who had been given the 18 M&M's from each noble, or 36 for the two knights, plus the 10 from his original share of the harvest, had now a total of 46, or 460% of the original share of the harvest.

      Becoming a knight was a great honor. Only boys from families of nobility became knights. When a boy turned eight, he was sent to a neighboring castle where he was trained as a page. At the age of fifteen or sixteen, the boy became a squire in the service of a knight. At the age of 20, the squire come become a knight if he proved himself;f worthy. Then a lord would dub him knight in a special ceremony.


      • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the peasant's life and a knight's life. Which one would you like to have been and give reasons.
      • Imagine you are a boy in training as a page. Write a letter home telling what you are doing and what your plans are in the future. Your letter should include details about the steps you will take to become a knight.
      • What is chivalry? List things that you do today that would have been considered chivalrous. List things you do that would be considered unworthy of a knight.
      • Compare the different types of armor used in the Middle Ages. Compare the armor from the Middle Ages with that worn at different times and places. Use pencil drawings, design armor that is comfortable and protects the wearer from battle wounds. Label the armor and describe the materials used.
      • During times of peace, knights needed to keep their fighting skills sharp. Tournaments were like real battles but were considered sport. What is tilting? Why did the kings and the church oppose tournaments? Jousting was also a form of entertainment. Learn a simplified version of jousting.
      • What are the advantages and disadvantages of various helmet styles?
      • Lists of other activities we completed can be found here and here.
      sources and resources:
      What history and geography studies have you been doing this week?
      I have really enjoyed the community of homeschoolers we have built here and I encourage you to check out the links you may not have seen and make a comment on the posts.

      As always I hope that you continue to link your new (and old) posts with any history and geography topic to this meme every Thursday.

      Multicultural Kid Blogs
      Don't forget to link up to the Multicultural Kids Blog's Blog Hop each month.


        Remember that I am pinning all posts to Pinterest.
      You might want to check out the Pinterest board and see all the past posts.
      Follow Phyllis Bergenholtz's board History and Geography Meme on Pinterest.

      Please include this button on either the post you have linked or your sidebar or mention All Things Beautiful History and Geography meme in your post with a link. All posts that do not link directly to a history or geography post will be deleted.
      All Things Beautiful

      Science Sunday: Model of the Components of Blood

      The Components of Blood

      Model of the Components of Blood

      To make a model of the components of blood, you will need 1 cup of white corn syrup, some yellow food coloring, some red candies such as red hots (we used Cherry Sour Balls), a white jelly bean and 1 teaspoon of round cake sprinkles.
       Plasma is the liquid that makes up a little over half of the blood. It is over 90% water. The other 10% is proteins, dissolved gases, salts, vitamins, nutrients, hormones and waste products that come from protein breakdown. Pour a cup of white corn syrup into a bowl to represent the plasma.
      Plasma is actually straw-colored so stir a bit of yellow food coloring into the white corn syrup.
      Red blood cells are so plentiful, they color the blood. Their job is to deliver oxygen and pick up carbon dioxide as they go through the bloodstream. The red blood cells make a protein called hemoglobin which contains iron atoms. Oxygen is attracted to the iron atoms, and gets pulled along with the hemoglobin through the bloodstream.
      For every 700 red blood cells, there will be one white blood cell. We represented this with one white jelly bean. White blood cells are generally larger than the red blood cells. The white blood cells fight infections and clean up the debris and dying cells.
      The last component of blood is the platelets, which are fragments of cells. These can be represented by about 1 teaspoon of sprinkles. Platelets aid in the process of coagulation, a chemical mechanism which clots blood when a blood vessel is broken, which keeps us from bleeding to death when we are cut.

      from Bones and the Skeletal System

      These fragments, if not used to form a clot, circulate in the bloodstream for about ten days before they are removed by special cells called phagocytes, which carry the fragments to the liver in order for the iron to be returned to bones via the liver.
      Red blood cells are short-lived and so are being continually being replaced by the bone marrow.
      Science Notebook Page, (left) James', age 14 (right) Quentin's, age 11

      When your students are finished making the model, they can make a sketch in their science journals and label the components of blood.

      Sources and Resources:
      • Exploring Creation with General Science, Jay Wile
      • Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology, Jeannie Fulbright and Brooke Ryan

      What science studies have you been doing?

      I am pinning all posts to Pinterest.

      Please include All Things Beautiful Science Sunday Meme in your post with a link
      All posts that do not link directly to a science related post will be deleted.

      July 3-9 Our Homeschool Weekly Report, week 32 Knights

      July 3-9, 2015

      On the 4th, we enjoyed a lovely cookout dinner and then we went to the fireworks, all with friends.
      Quentin is the third (standing) person from the right.

      Quentin got the part of Mr. Teal, a distinguished member of the community, in the musical Rats! He only has two lines and two songs, but he is happy with the part, so I am, too.

      On Wednesday night we had 12 people at the table for dinner and game night!
      We had two game nights this week with friends.

      week 32

      And for school work, the boys...
      • completed an activity about the feudal system.
      • designed a castle and built a model of the design.
      • wrote and sketched in history journal.
      • math problems involving knights.
      • learned about medieval cities and solved map problems.
      • built a solar water purifier.
      • made gyngerbrede.
      • learned about ladies in waiting.
      • did running long jumps.
      • completed a demonstration that showed their lung capacity.

      Sources and Resources: 
      • Time Capsule: Medieval History
      • Exploring Creation with General Science, Jay Wile
      • Exploring Creation with Human Anatomy and Physiology, Fulbright and Ryan

      What has your week been like?

      Join me at...
        Don't forget the Memes here at All Things Beautiful:
        • History and Geography on Thursdays
        • Science on Sundays