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Home School Life Journal
"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."
Saint Francis DeSales
painting by Katie Bergenholtz

World Geography: Nepal

This week we learned about Nepal, which is part of the Indian sub-continent.

 We learned where it is in relation to India.
We learned that Nepal has several different areas geographically, due to the dramatic variances in elevation levels, from tropical savannas along the Indian border, to subtropical forests in the Hill Region, to temperate forests on the slopes of the Himalaya, to grasslands and shrub-lands and then rock and ice at the highest elevations.. The mountainous north of Nepal has eight of the world's ten tallest mountains, including the highest point on earth, Mount Everest. 


"Even in such places, where life appears to be a constant battle against the elements, trekking in Nepal is made a pleasure by the warmth and good humor of the people as much as by the stunning landscapes." -World Food Cafe, Chris and Caryoln Caldicott

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The southern lowland plains or Terai bordering India are fertile and humid, and this is where Nepal's tea, rice, corn, wheat, sugarcane, root crops and water buffalo are raised. The Terai was formed and is fed by three major Himalayan rivers as well as smaller rivers.

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Lumbini, the birthplace of Lord Gautama Buddha and therefore one of the holiest places of the Buddhist religion, is located in this region. Even though Buddhism is linked historically with Nepal, Hinduism is practiced by most of Nepalis, making it the country with the highest percentage (about 82%) of Hindus. And so, we learned about Buddhism.


A typical Nepalese meal is Dal bhat. Dal is a spicy lentil soup, served over bhat (boiled rice), served with tarkari (curried vegetables) together with achar (pickles) orchutni (spicy condiment).


"In village homes, the meal is always eaten by mixing a little dal and vegetable or pickle with some rice and scooping it up with the right hand." -World Food Cafe, Chris and Caryoln Caldicott


6 comments:

  1. For some reason I'd thought he was born in India, I didn't know that.

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    1. Well, Nepal was part of India from time to time, so it is splitting hairs to separate the two, really.

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  2. The looks delicious and sounds like some awesome stuff was learned!

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  3. I'm not keen on pulses but the rest of the food looks yummy! I just think your food always looks so good. You don't fancy coming to England to cook for all of us do you?

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    Replies
    1. We eat a lot of pulses, and as it turns out, so does much of the world, so we are in luck. We all participate in the cooking, so you would have to have us all come to England, and that would instantly double your household. LOL

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  4. Going through all your recent world geography posts has me craving curries and daal! Such flavorful food.

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