Easter Egg and M & M's Genetics

Remember when we learned how to complete Punnett Squares?
If  you were looking for a more visual, hands-on way to practice their Punnett square-solving-skills, you can use plastic eggs leftover from Easter.
Assign a genotype to each egg color, such as the following:
Blue - BB
Green - Bb
Yellow - bb
This example uses incomplete dominance - i.e. Bb appears green, not blue, as it would in a straight dominant/recessive situation.
The eggs have been mixed and matched to create various genetic crosses. For example, a blue half matched with a green half would represent BB x Bb.
Now have your students use a Punnet square to solve the cross, and then open the egg to check their work!
has a worksheet your student can use to determine the Punnett Squares and the results.





Source: Science Matters

Science Sunday

9 comments:

  1. I love this! What a wonderful concrete way to teach this skill. You are a natural born teacher.
    Blessings,
    dawn

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  2. I love this idea. What a practical realistic way to show something we usually don't see. Thank you so much for sharing this idea. What age student/students are actually working on this project (translate that to how long should I wait before I try it with mine)?

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    1. It was review for my 9th grader. The lesson is generally for Middle Schoolers. You know your children, however, and you are the best judge of when they are ready for it. If you try it too early, there is no harm done, just stop and try again at another time.

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  3. Fantastic! We have a Punnett square lesson in our Froguts.com dissection stuff - this is a perfect go-along.

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  4. I just went and checked and right now Brainpop's "heridity" video can be accessed for free, too - you might want to check it out.

    http://www.brainpop.com/science/cellularlifeandgenetics/heredity/

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  5. WOW! What a great lesson! You have a fantastic teaching style!!!

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  6. I don't remember if I told you this, but I very much enjoyed in high school figuring out all of those little squares and putting in the right letter combination.

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  7. This is great Phyllis. I am pinning this to use! Another wonderful 'hands on' lesson

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  8. Anonymous1.5.12

    Such a good idea! At our homeschool, we randomly drew M&M's to fill in our Punnett squares. I wish I had seen your post first. It would have been much cooler to use the plastic eggs!

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