Home School Life Journal

Home School Life Journal
"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."
Saint Francis DeSales
painting by Katie Bergenholtz

Early Spring Flowers: Daffodils and Tulips

"...the sight of the daffodils floods the spirit with the sense of sunlight."
- Anna Comstock
3/31/09
"The daffodil, jonquil and narcissus are very closely related, and quite similar. They all come from bulbs...The flowers brought to school may be studied for form, and there should be a special study of the way the flower develops its seed, and how it is propagated by bulbs."
March 2011
Katie bought a daffodil and she planted it in our front flower bed. When we took it out of the pot, we took particular note of how the roots came out of the bulbs in the soil. We cut some of the blooms to bring inside to study and sketch. We learned that the flower-tube is called the corolla or crown.
3/31/09
"When we look down into the crown of one of these flowers, we see the long style with its three-lobed stigma pushing out beyond the anthers, which are pressed close about it at the throat of the tube; between each two anther may be seen a little deep passage, through with the tongues of the mouth or butterfly can be thrust to reach the nectar....the filaments of the stamens are grown fast to the sides of the tube for much of their length, enough remain free to press the anthers close to the style. The ovary of the pistil is a green swelling at the base of the tube...and has a little cavity in each angle large enough to hold two rows of the little white, shining, unripe seeds...The seeds should not be allowed to ripen as it costs the plant too much energy and thus robs the bulbs. The flowers should be cut just as they are opening." -Handbook of Nature Study
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March 2011
4/6/09

"The tulips blossom early because they have food stored in the bulbs the year before, ready to use in the spring." -HNS
4/6/09
Steven bought us a tulip to plant in the front yard and when he brought it home, the buds were all closed and all you could see was the green sepal which closed the bud tightly. As it began to bloom, you could see the sepals joining the petals inside in their pink color and release its grip, letting the petals inside unfold. We spread the petals open further to look at the flower's stamens and stigma. We compared the stem and leaves of the daffodil and the tulip and James noticed how the leaves cover the stem completely at the bottom of the stem. Katie noticed how much more broad the leaves of the tulip are compared to the daffodil.
4/6/09
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According to The Handbook of Nature Study the tulip made its way into Europe from the Orient in the sixteenth century. In Persia you could find the tulip's form used by the famous Persian weavers.
"A hundred years later, the Netherlands possessed with the tulip mania."

3 comments:

  1. Love this post! Our tulips haven't bloomed here, yet (almost!). I can't wait.

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  2. What a beautiful post and the artwork is worthy of frames. :)

    I love how they showed the flower growing from the bulb.

    Thank you for sharing your spring bulbs with the OHC.

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  3. The sketches and photos are beautiful! I like your new blog header too.

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