Home School Life Journal

Home School Life Journal ........... painting by Katie Bergenholtz
"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."
Saint Francis DeSales

Getting There is Half the Learning and Our Homeschool Weekly Report, June 6-12, week 35

June 6-12
This week we stayed home most of the week, which was a real change from our hectic schedule as of late.

 We had Black Cows (and Brown Cows for June 10th, National Black Cow Day. In case you don't know a Black Cow is an ice cream float made with chocolate syrup, vanilla ice cream and Coca-Cola. Brown Cows are made with Root Beer instead of Coca-Cola.

Katie's garden is doing well...
bouquet of mint, parsley, cilantro, dill, chives and lavender
and she picked me this bouquet of herbs to remind me to use them in the kitchen.
Sam's Classical Rhetoric workbook
 As our year is winding down, the subjects are falling off as we complete this year's work.
week 35

History

Ancient Rome

We have been working on a model of a Roman city, but most of it didn't work past the planning stage, so we have yet to have anything to show for our efforts. I am not sure whether the boys are going to give up the idea or forge ahead with it. Either way, they have learning a lot about Roman cities just from the planning stage.

We also learned about the gods and goddesses of Ancient Rome. We made a chart that compares the Roman gods with the Greek gods. We also learned about the early Christians. We will have our final Roman feast (minus the vomiting, I hope) next week for our last week of school for this year. We are learning a lot about the foods and the eating habits of the Ancient Romans.

Geography

African Masks

This week Alex began an project on African masks. This week we learned about African masks in general. We learned that most of the traditional masks we think of come from either West Africa or Equatorial Africa. We learned that African mask design centers around bold patterns which tend to be geometrical and symmetrical. Subtlety is not a quality you look for in tribal masks. Parallel, zigzag, cruciform, curved and spiral lines, representing scarification marks or tattoos, are frequently used to adorn the mask face. Square and triangular checkerboard grids are often carved to decorate sections of a design. Patterns on the top of the head can also can show the complex African braided hairstyles. Stylized and simplified features are used to help express abstract qualities like nobility, integrity, courage, fear and humor. Symmetrical arrangements of line, shape and form in masks evoke a sense of integrity and dignity. Straight, simplified, linear designs are often used to contrast with the curves on the rest of the mask. Using different combinations of colored cards will affect the mood of the mask. Alex will be completing an art project inspired by African masks next week.

English

Grammar: Questions and Interrogative Pronouns

An interrogative sentence asks a question. The word "interrogative" comes from the Latin verb "rogare," meaning "to ask." An interrogative sentence, therefore, is a question and must be punctuated with a question mark. There are two kinds of questions...


  • inverted word order: the verb is turned around and put at the beginning (Are you going home early?)
  • introduced by an interrogative or questioning word (Who is at the door?)
    • Interrogative pronouns:
      • Who (person) or What (thing) for subject
      • Whose (for possessive)
      • Whom (person) or What (thing) for object of verb or preposition

18 comments:

  1. Goodness, Phyllis! Your grammar lessons blow me away. I mean I know to put a question mark at the end of a question but all the rest? Not a clue! Your children are going to be very grammatically correct. I'm happy if mine remember the question mark!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had to work on it because it was a weakness.

      Delete
  2. As always you all have an awesome blend of learning and fun.
    Blessings, Dawn

    ReplyDelete
  3. Brown cow!!! I never knew that! I love 'em.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mmm black and brown cows sound delicious! You study grammar wonderfully thoroughly. We were doing Latin questions this week and my daughter asked how we form questions in English. She was quite surprised to realise how complex it is!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Katie's garden is wonderful!! I love how you celebrate cool holidays. And as always your 'lessons' seem great Phyllis. I hope this is such a beautiful, lovely summer for you and your family.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ooooh! I've had rootbeer and ice cream floats before but the added chocolate syrup sounds awesome!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It makes them even better!!

      Delete
  7. Love Katie's garden - it looks like it is doing very, very well. One of the things we are doing in the garden this year is a Three Sisters Garden (a Native American gardening strategy).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have always wanted to do a Three Sisters Garden, but I have not done it yet!

      Delete
  8. The garden's yield is looking good! Was it hard or easy to take a break from running around? Some weeks it seems like I just Want o get out somewhere every day and other weeks I want to be a hermit! Phyllis, you have inspired me to get a little more formal with Jeremiah's Language Arts for next year!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess it was a mixture in terms of how hard it was to take a break. I am naturally a hermit, so it was great for me to take a break. Not as good on my more social kids.

      Delete
  9. What a lovely herb bouquet - that might be the best way to get us using ours as well! I hope we get to see pictures of Alex's African mask project - I can't believe we haven't gotten around to those yet!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, yes, but it is a simple project...not nearly as elaborate as the projects you guys do!

      Delete
  10. She's got an amazing garden!
    I've been toying with the idea of building a Roman city, but haven't quite decided on it yet.

    ReplyDelete
  11. We need to study Rome next year. I need to start taking notes from you! :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I just stopped by and had to print off the picture of the brown cows and black cows to remind me to share this information with the children! They would love to know (and to make some)!!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for taking the time to comment. It means so much.