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"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."
Saint Francis DeSales
painting by Katie Bergenholtz

Science Curriculum, 2013-2014


Highhill Education has started a new Lesson-Planning Linkup and this week's topic is Science Curriculum. Like our history, we also generally complete our science topics in a rotation; Chemistry, Biology and Physical Science in a three-year cycle, advancing the complexity with each time we cycle through.
Next year we will be working primarily with chemistry topics. I use a basic text and then branch out from there.
We also enjoy lots of Living books for our science studies. These are some of the titles I know we are going to use for the younger boys.
  • Archimedes and the Door of Science, Jeanne Bendick
  • Science in Ancient Mesopotamia, Carol Moss
  • Science in Ancient Egypt, Geraldine Woods
  • Science in Ancient China, George Beshore
  • Science in Ancient Greece, Kathlyn Gay
I will also be using these with Sam:


Links:
Next post will be about our History Curriculum.

Highhill Education's Lesson Planning Link-Up Schedule
July 11 - Writing
July 18 - Math
July 25 - Science
August 1 - History
August 8 - Music
August 15 - Art & Handicrafts
August 22 - Geography
August 29 - Foreign Language
September 5 - Reading
September 12 - Organization your Classroom/Schedule

11 comments:

  1. I like the way you do science!

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  2. I'll enjoy reading about your chemistry. T11 wants more of that but it's fitting it all in, you know?

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    1. Oh, I do know. There is so much to cover in so little time.

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  3. It's an interesting idea to do these topics in rotation and not in parallel. When I went to school we had separate classes for these subjects starting 4th grade. This is what I'd do if I were homeschooling :)

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  4. Oh my goodness, I am reading The Disappearing Spoon now! It is FASCINATING! I'm sharing tidbits with Sarah as I find parts that will interest her; some is a little "wordy" for where she's at right now, but her interest in chemistry is such that I can drop in bits and pieces as I hit them!

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    1. If you like the Disappearing Spoon, you might like to read Napoleon's Buttons. Yes, it is really for older people, although I share some of the more interesting pieces, too, as I am sure Sam will too, once we get to beginning the new school year.

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  5. I can't wait to see your science this year!

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  6. The disappearing spoon sounds like a really cool April fools joke. I've heard lots of good things about Real Science 4 Kids and we also enjoyed the Archimedes book. Thanks for linking with Highhill Education.

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  7. Looks great! I look forward to your chemistry posts, because I'm sure I'll get lots of things to pin to my "things that go boom" board :)

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  8. I am interested to read how the year turned out.

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    1. It turned out great! If you get a chance to look through the chemistry posts, you can see what we did.

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Thank you so much for taking the time to comment. It means so much.