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Home School Life Journal
"Let us strive to make each moment beautiful."
Saint Francis DeSales
painting by Katie Bergenholtz

Field Trip: Manassas Battlefield, Virginia

















Much of the landscape within Manassas National Battlefield Park still retains its wartime character. Henry Hill, focus of heavy fighting at First Manassas in July 1861, is still cleared, though now neat and lush after decades of farming. A new farmhouse marks the site of the old. The unfinished railroad, scene of much of the fighting at Second Manassas, still runs through the woods north of the Warrenton Turnpike. The peacefulness of the Chinn Farm, its house and outbuildings now gone, belies the violence that took place there. The Stone House - the former Union aid station - still stands as it has since the 1840s, overlooking the Warrenton Turnpike. These and other sites on the battlefields of Manassas can be reached by following hiking trails and driving tours. Manassas National Battlefield Park has over 40 miles of hiking trails, traversing key areas of the First and Second Manassas Battlefields. Many of these hikes include trailside interpretive markers describing the battle action that occurred.  Uniformed National Park Service personnel will gladly answer your questions and help you make the most of your visit.The park is open daily from dawn until dusk. The park is free.

1 comment:

  1. We really wanted to visit Bull Run when my husband was working in Virginia but didn't ever make it. We did go to Petersburg and found out that we couldn't possibly see everything in one day- it was huge! Petersburg would be a drive from Northern VA, but if you ever find yourself that way their Jr. Ranger program was one of the few my kids actually really enjoyed! :) Thanks for linking up to Field Trip Friday!

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